Imagine an elderly woman asked you what you did for a living while you both waited for the bus. What would you say?

I program marketing automation platforms, which is like when you’re shopping at Amazon and you put something in your cart, and you don’t buy it. When they send you an email saying, “you didn’t buy that thing,” that’s sent from a marketing automation system. I make that happen.

What would your parents rather you do instead of sending elderly women cart-abandon emails?

They’d rather I work in Finance. They were always pushing me to become a finance major.
Editor’s note: Caitlin’s oldest brother works in advertising. Her middle brother works in finance. Apparently, her parents saw both paths and decided finance was the better road to travel.

What’s the most exciting thing about this field that keeps you here and not in night school studying finance?

The variety of work I do. I’m not doing the same thing every day. I like the fast-paced environment.

No, Caitlin, I mean marketing.

I think marketing technology has a lot of cool new tools and there are lots of ways to do things. It’s interesting. Can we move on?

Yes.
You started out as a designer. What made you ditch the pixels for <div> tags?

I used to work at a previous agency. Sometimes, it felt like our clients wanted our websites to look more like they were built in the 1980s. I pitched lots of awesome ideas to clients. They didn’t want them. I was becoming a stronger developer, because my creative side was stifled.

When I applied at ID, I was deciding between the role ID was hiring for, which was a developer, or another company, which was looking for a creative technologist. I decided to come to ID and embrace development. Eventually, I gravitated toward programming in marketing automation platforms. Now, I get to be creative in new ways. When you consider that before I was a designer, I had plans to go to medical school, I think you’d agree that this has been the typical millennial career path.

I’m sorry. No.
If I asked you what it’s like to be a woman in tech, would that exhaust you?

No. I guess, since I grew up in a male-dominated family, it wasn’t weird for me to be the only female involved in things only males were doing. When I started at my last company, I was the only female developer there. It didn’t really bother me that there weren’t any others. By the time I left, we had an entire team of female developers.

When I came to ID, we only had Becky. She’s been a really positive role model for women in tech. I think a lot of companies have done a better job at hiring females in the tech industry, but I’m not seeing a lot of female managers. One of my favorite parts about working here is that my manager is Becky. And she’s amazing. I feel like everyone talks about females in the tech industry like it’s a big deal. And in my experience, men and women in the tech industry are pretty much the same.

In case no one has told you, you’re a millennial. What’s the most cliched millennial thing about you?

I feel like my parents raised me to not be a millennial cliche. I wasn’t allowed to be entitled to things. I don’t think I’m interesting enough to have a huge social media presence. But I am addicted to my cellphone. And my job is the Internet. So, you know…

If you could see any band in concert, alive or otherwise, who would it be?

The Beatles. They were such a big part of my childhood. My dad was always playing The Beatles and The Beach Boys. He has had the same Beach Boys mix in his car for as long as I can remember.

Typically, we ask IDers to tell a joke in these things. Will you-

No. That’s the worst.

Fair enough. Parting thoughts?

I’m scared to read what you’ve typed. Like now. What are you typing now?
Editor’s note: I was typing the above answer, verbatim.

Theo Romeo

Author Theo Romeo

More posts by Theo Romeo

Theo oversees ID’s Creative Department and works with ID’s other practice areas to architect integrated campaign messaging and content strategies. Theo is routinely demanding to know more about your prospects’ pain points, your unique value proposition, and the best way to address both in your campaign’s messaging architecture.

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